Mysteries and mayhem in steampunk Melbourne – coming soon

While I query on Return to the Monolith, I’ve decided to keep anxiety at bay (see last week’s post) by putting my Evangeline novellas out into the world.

The Antics of Evangeline is a series of novellas involving mysteries and mayhem in steampunk Melbourne. In the 1880s, Melbourne was the second largest settlement in the British Empire after London and flush with post-gold rush cash.

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The first novella in The Antics of Evangeline is Evangeline and the Alchemist.

Evangeline and the Alchemist

Evangeline, a seventeen year old reformed urchin and acrobat, is settling into a new comfortable life with her long lost father, Professor Caldicott. Although learning to be a lady is awfully dull.

When the police come to the door, seeking the Professor’s expertise in catching an alchemist, is this Evangeline’s chance to test her new invention and save the day? With well-deserved rests for cream buns, of course.

A beta reader described Evangeline and the Alchemist as “The Talons of Weng Chiang meets Buffy the Vampire Slayer.”

Here’s a sneak peek at the first page of Evangeline and the Alchemist (although a previous draft).

Evangeline will come into the world in mid-2016. I’ll post further updates on the launch date once all is confirmed. I’m currently in final beta reading, cover design and setting up copy-editing.

 

 

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My Top 3 Writing Podcasts

I like to walk. I like to listen to stuff while I walk.

I’ve been into podcasts for over ten years now, ever since my knitting obsessed days. Yes, there are knitting podcasts. Don’t you know, knitting is a thing – check out Ravelry with over 6 million subscribers. But I digress into knitting defensiveness. Back to podcasts.

I listen podcasts on various topics from personal development to exercise to the paranormal to current events to films and of course, writing. Today I’m sharing my top 3 writing podcasts (for today – podcasts come and go).

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Here are my top 3 Writing Podcasts

So You Want to Be a Writer

A weekly podcast with Valerie Khoo and Alison Tait of the Australian Writers Centre.

Why I like it – An Australian perspective on writing with weekly regular segments and a long interview with a working writer. While basically content marketing for the Australian Writer’s Centre, the content is useful and informative across all genres, covering mainly traditional publishing.

The Creative Penn Podcast

A weekly podcast from Joanna Penn of the Creative Penn

Why I like it – Joanna Penn is passionate about indie publishing and inspiring others. She is interested in many different aspects of the writing world (including new technology and global expansion) and has great interviews with writers, pundits and other publishing related people. I always get something from each week.

Science-Fiction and Fantasy Marketing Podcast

A niche weekly podcast based on marketing for indie published science-fiction and fantasy writers hosted by Lindsay Buroker, Joseph Lallo and Jeffrey Poole.

Why I like it – no frills, no fancy music or advertising. Just authors asking other authors about their writing and their marketing approaches. Good solid information.

What are your favourite writing podcasts?

Recent listens: How to Publish Your Book by Jane Friedman

I like my audiobooks. But for some unknown reason, I can’t focus on fiction in audio. My mind wanders and I miss sections of the story, so I’ve learned to stick with non-fiction for audiobooks.

A recent listen was How to Publish Your Book by Jane Friedman, available through The Great Courses. This is available through Audible and you’ll also receive the accompanying lecture notes in PDF.

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What a damn fine resource for the new author! In 24 lectures, Friedman takes you through the process of getting published from both a fiction and non-fiction perspective. Friedman also has a brilliant blog where she discusses the state of the publishing nation.

This is for those writers who are done with the manuscript and ready to move from the art to the business side. She starts off talking you through understanding your genre and your audience then to the process of

  • finding agents, publishers and editors,
  • sharpening your pitch, query letter and synopsis,
  • contracts,
  • the need for marketing and building your author platform.

Friedman also tackles the interesting subject – “when to self-publish?” A controversial topic indeed. Are you being impatient? Is self-publishing really for you? Is your market too niche for a mainstream publisher?

I’m currently querying agents with my Return to the Monolith manuscript and the course provided information on what to expect and importantly, how to cope with rejection.

The information is up-to-date and discussed many of the players in the current market. This is the best all-in-one resource I’ve found on publishing.

Do you have any recommendations for great publishing resources?